Some Important Statistics on the Effects of Divorce Can Have on Your Children

by | Jun 14, 2017

According to statistics, about half of families today will go through a divorce, and half of those will even experience a second divorce. As it becomes more common, research showing the effects of divorce on children is becoming more in-depth. Of course it’s hard, but did you know it can cause physical and extreme emotional health issues for children, sometimes even continue into their adulthood? Father of five Wayne Parker has some insightful information for parents to consider below.

There is no question that divorce can have a big impact on children. The following statistics suggest that fathers need to do all they can to preserve marriage where possible, and if already divorced, to be a responsible and involved father.

The Incidence of Divorce

Approximately 50% American children will witness the breakup of a parent’s marriage. Of these, close to half will also see the breakup of a parent’s second marriage.

(Furstenberg, F.F., Nord, C.W., Peterson, J.L., and Zill, N. (1983). “The Life Course of Children of Divorce.” American Sociological Review 48(5): 656-668.)

One of every 10 children whose parents have divorced will also see three or more subsequent parental marriage breakups. (Gallager, Maggie. The Abolition of Marriage: How We Destroy Lasting Love)

Of all children born to married parents this year, fifty percent will experience the divorce of their parents before they reach their 18th birthday. (Patrick F. Fagan and Robert Rector, “The Effects of Divorce on America,” Heritage Foundation Backgrounder, May 2000.)

The Physical Effects of Divorce on Children

Children whose parents have divorced are more likely to experience injury, asthma, headaches and speech impediments than children whose parents have remained married. (Dawson, Deborah. “Family Structure and Children’s Health and Well-Being: Data from the 1988 National Health Interview Survey on Child Health.” Journal of Marriage and the Family 53(August 1991):573-84.)

Following a divorce, children are fifty percent more likely to develop health problems than two parent families. (Ronald Angel and Jacqueline L. Worobey, “Single Motherhood and Children’s Health,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior 29 (1985): 38 – 52.)

Children living with both biological parents are 20 to 35 percent more physically healthy than children from homes without both biological parents present.

(Dawson, Deborah, “Family Structure and Children’s Health and Well-Being: Data from the 1988 National Health Interview Survey on Child Health.” Journal of Marriage and the Family 53(August 1991):573-84)

Read the full article on The Spruce